How to Stop Your Dog's Ear Mites from Coming Back

The best way to get rid of your dog's ear mites is to take them to a vet for medication that kills the mites. This treatment can take a few weeks, but it's sure to put an end to your dog's scratching, head shaking and ear abrasions. However, ear mite treatment isn't a permanent cure. If you're not careful, your dog could get ear mites again—and again, and again—leading to more discomfort for your pup and more money in veterinary bills for you.   Read More...

Don't Ignore These Signs of Foreign Body Obstruction in Your Cat

Sometimes curiosity really can spell bad times for the cat. They're curious creatures, and that often leads them to eat things they really shouldn't. Anything from string to coins can be eaten by your cat, and those objects might not make it successfully through the digestive system. When they don't, your cat will suffer from foreign body obstruction. Here are just a few signs that might have happened. Vomiting and Retching   Read More...

When is Your Dog's Vomiting an Emergency?

Most of the time, a vomiting dog is nothing to worry about. However, in some cases, vomiting can be a sign that your dog needs to see an emergency vet. Here are 3 situations where your dog's vomiting constitutes an emergency. Remember that this list is not exhaustive; if your dog's behaviour is concerning or you're worried for any other reason, it's best to get your dog to the clinic for your own peace of mind.   Read More...

Understanding Ear Cysts In Dogs

When the middle ear, located behind the eardrum, becomes infected, cysts can form around the eardrum. These cysts, known as cholesteatoma, tend to occur when an infection has been present for an extended period of time, which isn't uncommon, as it's not always easy to spot the signs of a middle ear infection in dogs. All breeds of dog can develop ear cysts, but those with droopy ears, narrow ear canals or hair growth in the outer ear canal are at a greater risk of ear infections.   Read More...

Filled Legs - When To Call The Vet

Oedema is a very common problem faced by most horse owners from time-to-time. 'Filled legs', as the condition is colloquially known, is usually simple to resolve, but there are times when it can be indicative of a more serious issue where veterinary attention is required. So, what causes filled legs and when should you call the vet? What causes filled legs? Filled legs refers to a condition where the horse's lower legs become swollen and puffy.   Read More...